University of Mary Hardin-Baylor

ARCHIVE: UMHB Musical Theatre Presents The Fantasticks

November 13, 2013
UMHB presents The Fantasticks
UMHB presents The Fantasticks

Belton, TX – This weekend the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor Department of Music presents the UMHB Musical Theatre production of The Fantasticks under the direction of George Hogan. Performances are November 15 and 16 at 7:30 p.m. and November 17 at 2:30 p.m. in the Azalee Marshall Cultural Activities Center in Temple. Ticket prices are $15 for adults and $5 for seniors, students and children.

Since its opening in May, 1960, at the Sullivan Street Playhouse in New York, and its subsequent revival at the Snapple Theatre Center, The Fantasticks has become the longest running production of any kind in the history of American theatre. The musical has played more than 11,103 U.S. productions covering every state and for over 2,000 cities and towns. Internationally, more than 700 productions have been staged in 67 nations from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

The Fantasticks was written by two Texans. Lyricist and librettist Tom Jones was born in Littlefield. He was the son of a turkey farmer and attended the University of Texas where he studied theatre directing. While at UT he met Harvey Schmidt, an art major from Dallas, who played piano by ear.

The musical follows the humorous romance between a boy, the girl next door, and the two fathers who plot to bring them together. The narrator, El Gallo, originally played by Jerry Orbach, asks the audience to use their imagination and follow him into a world of moonlight and magic. The boy and the girl fall in love, grow apart, and finally find their way back to each other after realizing that "without a hurt, the heart is hollow.”

The music includes classics like “Try to Remember,” “They Were You,” and “Soon It's Gonna Rain.” With its minimal costumes, small band, and virtually non-existent set, The Fantasticks is an intimate show that engages the imagination.

For tickets and more information call (254) 295-4678.

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